B2G User Interface Manual

Version: 1.14.193
Date: 2017-12-14 19:14 UTC
Organization: National Braille Press
Contact: Brian Mac Donald
Address:
88 St. Stephen Street
Boston, MA 02115
United States of America

Contents

1   General Notes

1.2   Resetting the B2G

If you ever need to reset the B2G then press Dots4568 (all four on the right) along with the Volume Down key (the one nearest the front). Release all of these keys as soon as you hear a short, high-pitched beep repeating slowly. You'll hear several of these beeps and then the B2G will reboot.

2   Physical Description

2.1   The Top

[a picture of the top]

The eight, rectangular, concave keys (in two groups of four) near the back of the top comprise a standard, eight-dot, braille keyboard. The four on the left, from left to right, are dots 7, 3, 2, and 1. The four on the right, from left to right, are dots 4, 5, 6, and 8.

  • The Dot7 key is often referred to as the Backspace key.
  • The Dot8 key is often referred to as the Enter key.

The square pad with a small, round button in the middle, in between the Dot1 and Dot4 keys, is the five-key D-Pad (directional pad). Its four edges are the Up, Down, Left, and Right keys. The button in the middle is the Center key.

The long, rectangular key in front of the Dot1 key, the D-Pad, and the Dot4 key is the Space key (or bar).

The braille display (20 eight-dot cells) is at the front of the top. There's a small, round button just behind each cell - these are the cursor routing keys. The convex, square button to the left of the cursor routing keys is the Backward key, and the one to their right is the Forward key.

2.2   The Front

[a picture of the front]

Two internal speakers (for the left and right stereo channels) are, correspondingly, at the left and right ends of the front.

The internal microphone is just behind a very small slit near the bottom, in the middle of the front.

2.3   The Left Side

[a picture of the left side]

The headset jack, a 3.5mm OMTP (Open Mobile Terminal Platform) port, is near the front of the left side. Standard OMTP-compatible earphones, including those with a microphone, can be used.

The composite video (RCA) jack is in the middle of the left side. It's for connecting an external video monitor or TV, and is used for performing diagnostics. This capability also provides an easy way for a sighted person to offer direct assistance.

A standard USB-A (or host) port is near the back of the left side. USB devices (memory stick, external keyboard, mouse, Ethernet adapter, hub, etc) can be connected to it. Devices that draw power from the port will drain the battery so using a powered hub, when possible, should be considered.

2.4   The Right Side

[a picture of the right side]

The volume controls are the two, small, round buttons near the front of the right side. The one toward the front is the Volume Down key, and the one toward the back is the Volume Up key. These keys, when pressed on their own, adjust the volume of the current Android audio stream.

2.4.1   The Power Switch

The Power switch is the slide switch near the back of the right side. It's off position is toward the front, and its on position is toward the back.

If the system is shut down, then:

  • Switching it on boots the device. You should hear one short beep. If, instead, you hear three short beeps then the battery is too low and the device won't boot. In this case, switch it back off, and then charge the battery for a while before trying again.
  • Switching it on while holding VolumeDown boots the device into Recovery Mode.

If the system is running, then:

  • Switching it off puts the system to sleep.
  • Switching it on wakes the system up.

When the system is either booted or woken up, the following settings are reset to their default values:

2.5   The Back

[a picture of the back]

The SD card slot is the long slot in the middle of the back.

A micro USB-B (or device) port is near the left end of the back. It's primary use is for charging the battery. The battery can be charged from a computer's USB port.

2.6   The Bottom

[a picture of the bottom]

All refreshable braille displays are fragile. Don't ever put the B2G, upside down, onto a hard surface. If you need to turn it over, e.g. either to press The Reset Button or to open The Removable Cover, then first place the B2G onto a protective, cushion-like surface.

There are six rubber foot pads on the bottom - one at each of the four corners, one in the middle near the front, and one in the middle near the back.

The camera's lens is within the small, raised circle on the bottom that's about 2cm (3/4 of an inch) in from the middle of the right side. The sunken, rectangular window that's a little further in is where the flash LEDs are.

2.6.1   The Reset Button

The Reset button is hidden within a very small, round hole on the bottom. If the device is turned over, front to back, the hole is at about the eight o'clock position relative to, and very close to, the foot nearest to the Power switch. A thin, round, blunt-tipped object, like the end of an unbent paperclip, should be used to press it.

To reset the B2G, slowly insert the paperclip into the hole, keeping it almost vertical but leaning slightly toward you. You should feel a soft click, and also hear a long, high-pitched beep. You only need to press gently. If it feels like you're pressing against a hard surface then you've missed the button.

2.6.2   The Removable Cover

There's a removable, rectangular, plastic cover in the middle of the bottom. To remove it:

  1. Turn the device over so that its bottom is on top.
  2. Press gently down on the cover, and then slide it toward the side where the Power switch is.
  3. Lift the end of the cover that's toward the side where the earphone jack is.

Be careful after you've removed the cover because the underside of a circuit board will be exposed.

[a picture of what's under the cover]

Removing the cover is how to gain access to the following:

  • The Micro-SIM card slot is in the corner that's toward the front and toward the side where the Power switch is. To gain access to the actual slot, slide its cover slightly toward the front and then lift the end of it that's toward the back. As with most SIM card slot covers, its hinge is fragile so be gentle.
  • The Serial Port is in the corner that's toward the back and toward the side where the Power switch is. It's a 10-pin (2x5) male connector that can be used by the B2G developers to perform low-level system maintenance.

3   Overview

3.1   Ways to Learn

There are a number of ways to learn about the B2G User Interface right on the B2G itself. Pressing Space+h (dots 125) presents a list of the available documents. If one of the key combinations listed below is entered within two seconds then immediately go to its corresponding document. If not, then an Action Chooser is presented that lets you select the desired document from a list.

Each of the documents is available in one or more of the following formats:

Plain Text
A document in this format resides on the B2G itself and, therefore, can be read off-line. Neither external nor internal links within it will work.
HTML

A document in this format resides on the web. Both external and internal links within it will work. There are some factors to consider when Reading a document in this format:

  • This operation requires access to the Internet. Standard data charges may apply.
  • Some web browsers are less accessible than others, and some aren't accessible at all. If the B2G User Interface tells you that there's a "web view" where you're expecting to find the content of a web page then you're using a non-accessible browser. As of the time that this is being written, we recommend that you use the Chrome browser.

The available documents are:

l (dots 123)

Present a list of all the actions that don't involve a cursor routing key within an action chooser. Hold Space while pressing a cursor routing key for an action chooser offering all the actions that do require a cursor routing key.

Each line shows the name of an action, the key combination that performs it (when not within the chooser), and a summary of what it does. You can perform an action from within the chooser by pressing Center while on its line.

m (dots 134)
The plain-text version of the user manual (this document).
q (dots 12345)
The plain-text version of the quickstart guide.
v (dots 1236)
The plain-text version of the VoiceOver guide.
w (dots 2456)
The plain-text version of the Limited Warranty and Return Policy.
Dots123456
The product page for the B2G (in HTML, of course).
M (dots 13478)
The HTML version of the user manual (this document).
Q (dots 1234578)
The HTML version of the quickstart guide.
V (dots 123678)
The HTML version of the VoiceOver guide.
W (dots 245678)
The HTML version of the Limited Warranty and Return Policy.

3.2   Key Combinations

A key combination may include any number of keys (including just one). There's only one restriction regarding which keys may be used to form a key combination, namely that only one cursor routing key may be used at a time. If more than one cursor routing key is pressed at the same time, then the first one that was pressed is used.

If any of the keys of a combination is released before the long press timeout (see Long Press Mode) expires then the action bound to that combination is executed. If the timeout expires then the action is immediately executed even though none of the keys has been released yet.

The way to cancel a key combination that's been accidentally started is to press enough additional keys such that an unbound key combination is being attempted. A key combination that's been formally defined for this purpose is all eight dots plus Space.

3.2.1   Long Press Mode

A secondary action may be bound to a key combination. A key combination's secondary action is executed if all of its keys are held until the long press timeout expires. The long press timeout is half a second.

This mode is enabled by default. Pressing Forward+Dot6 enables it, and pressing Backward+Dot3 disables it.

3.2.2   One Hand Mode

One Hand Mode has been designed to make the B2G easy to use by those who only have the use of one of their hands. It's disabled by default. Pressing Dot8+Forward enables it, and pressing Dot7+Backward disables it. Both of these key combinations were chosen so that they can be reasonably easily pressed with a single hand.

When One Hand Mode is enabled, each dot key of a combination may be pressed separately. For those whose operable hand is sufficiently functional, pressing more than one key at a time is supported. Press Space after all of the keys have been pressed to indicate that the combination has been fully entered. The Space key itself isn't included within the combination. If the combination does contain the Space key then an additional Space must be pressed, by itself, first.

So:

  1. If Space is part of the combination then press it, on its own, first.
  2. Press the dot keys of the combination either separately or in groups.
  3. Press Space to indicate that the combination has been fully entered.

To type a space (which is a key combination without any dots), simply press Space twice (with no dot keys in between). There's a quick way to type a space immediately after typing a character (except after a space). After pressing all of the dots that represent the character, followed by Space to complete that combination, quickly press Space again (just once). The amount of time that you have to do this (before pressing Space reverts to starting a new combination that includes it) can be customized via the Space Timeout setting (which defaults to 1 second).

If Space is pressed at the same time as at least one other key then all of the pressed keys (including Space) are added to the current combination, and the combination is then considered to be complete. This allows users who are able to press Space together with other keys to navigate more quickly.

Pressing any of the other B2G keys:

  • a panning key (Forward, Backward)
  • a D-Pad key (Up, Down, Left, Right, Center)
  • a cursor routing key
  • a volume key

also signals the completion of the current key combination. In this case, you don't press Space to indicate that you're done. That key, as well as all of the other keys that are also pressed at the same time, are included within the current combination.

While this feature allows for natural and efficient screen navigation, it also means that a combination involving more than one of these other keys can't be used when in One Hand Mode. Additional alternate combinations have been defined, therefore, in order to mitigate this restriction. They are:

Alternate Key Combinations for One Hand Mode
Action Key Combination
display status indicators Space+i (dots 24)
display build details Space+v (dots 1236)
set start of text selection Dot1+Cursor
set end of text selection Dot4+Cursor
disable Sleep Talk Mode Dot5+VolumeDown
enable Sleep Talk Mode Dot5+VolumeUp
disable speech Dot6+VolumeDown
enable speech Dot6+VolumeUp

If you don't press any keys for a while after having started a combination then that combination is automatically cancelled and you need to start over. The amount of time before a combination is cancelled can be customized via the Pressed Timeout setting (which defaults to 15 seconds).

3.3   Typing Characters

3.3.1   Typing Modes

Space+Dots78+t (dots 2345) displays a message (see Messages) that confirms which typing mode is currently being used.

Regular text is the default, and is used for Directly Typing Regular Text.

Actual cells is used for Directly Typing Actual Braille Cells.

Either booting the B2G or waking it up (see The Power Switch) automatically resets the typing mode to regular text.

3.3.1.1   Directly Typing Regular Text

Space+Dot7+t (dots 2345) restores the typing mode to regular text (the default). This mode honours the currently selected braille mode (see Braille Modes and Codes).

3.3.1.1.1   Typing in Literary Braille

Any character (or character sequence) that has a defined Literary Braille representation within the currently selected braille code can be typed.

In general, a cursor routing key corresponds to the first character of the literary braille symbol that it's behind. The only exception to this rule is when setting the end of a text selection. In that case it corresponds to the last character of the symbol.

A cursor routing key may, on occasion, seem to be corresponding to the wrong character. This is because the rules used to define the currently selected braille code sometimes need to group more than one symbol together. For example, in UEB (Unified English Braille), at the time of this writing:

  • There are two ways to contract "ear": either by using the "ea" contraction or by using the "ar" contraction. To ensure that the "ar" contraction is always used, the whole sequence is covered by a single rule. The cursor routing key behind the "ar" contraction, therefore, unexpectedly corresponds to the "e" rather than to the "a".
  • The honourific title "Saint" is often written as "St.". In order to prevent the "st" contraction from being used, there's a rule that also covers the trailing period. When setting the end of a text selection, therefore, the cursor routing keys behind the "s" and the "t" unexpectedly set the end of the selection to the period.

Deleting characters (see Input Areas) is done one text character at a time.

A special literary braille prefix, e.g. a capitalization sign, may not appear until the first character of the symbol it applies to has been typed.

The ability to type any character by entering its Unicode value (see Indirectly Typing Any Character) doesn't work when literary braille is being used. If you need to do it then you'll need to (temporarily) switch to Computer Braille mode.

3.3.1.1.2   Typing in Computer Braille

Any character that has a defined Computer Braille representation (see Computer Braille Characters) can be directly typed by pressing the corresponding keys as a single combination. There are two exceptions to this simple (and obvious) rule.

If the defined representation of a character is either just dot 7 or just dot 8 then it can't be typed by pressing the corresponding key because those keys are, respectively, Backspace and Enter. Press Space+Dot7 for just dot 7, and press Space+Dot8 for just dot 8.

3.3.1.2   Directly Typing Actual Braille Cells

Space+Dot8+t (dots 2345) sets the typing mode to actual cells.

In this typing mode, the characters that render in text as actual braille cells (see Unicode Braille Patterns) can be directly typed by pressing the corresponding keys as a single combination.

Two of these characters can't be typed by pressing the corresponding keys - just dot 7 (because it's the Backspace key), and just dot 8 (because it's the Enter key). Press Space+Dot7 for just dot 7, and press Space+Dot8 for just dot 8.

These characters have several uses, including (but not limited to):

  • Actual braille cells can be written into text documents.
  • Contracted braille can be accurately saved.
  • Braille music can be accurately saved, and also shared with others who use different localized braille character mappings.

3.3.2   Typing Highlighted Characters

The following highlighting styles are supported for typing:

Bold

  • Press Space+Dot8+b (dots 12) to turn it on.
  • Press Space+Dot7+b (dots 12) to turn it off.

Italics

  • Press Space+Dot8+i (dots 24) to turn it on.
  • Press Space+Dot7+i (dots 24) to turn it off.

Strike-through

  • Press Space+Dot8+s (dots 234) to turn it on.
  • Press Space+Dot7+s (dots 234) to turn it off.

Underlining

  • Press Space+Dot8+u (dots 136) to turn it on.
  • Press Space+Dot7+u (dots 136) to turn it off.

Pressing Space+Dots78+h (dots 125) displays a pop-up (see Pop-ups) that lists the highlighting styles that are currently active.

Press Space+Dot7+h (dots 125) to turn all of these highlighting styles off. Either booting the B2G or waking it up (see The Power Switch) also turns them off.

Each highlighted character that you type will be flagged by The Selection Indicator. You can verify that a character has been highlighted correctly by holding Dot3 while pressing the cursor routing key associated with it.

3.3.3   Typing a Control Character

In order to type a control character, press Space+x (dots 1346) immediately before the letter or special symbol that represents it (see ASCII Control Characters). For example, in order to type a tab (which happens to be control I), press Space+x and then immediately type the letter i.

The letter or special symbol must be typed within two seconds.

3.3.4   Indirectly Typing Any Character

Any character can always be indirectly typed, even if directly typing it isn't possible:

  • Its braille representation hasn't been defined.
  • You don't know its braille representation.
  • It's represented in braille by either just dot 7 (the Backspace key) or just dot 8 (the Enter key).

In order to indirectly type it, press Space+u (dots 136). This brings up a prompt (see Prompts) with the following header:

Unicode> U+

U+ is the conventional prefix for the hexadecimal value of a Unicode character. The prompt allows you to enter up to four hexadecimal digits - 0 through 9 and A through F (either upper or lower case). Leading zeroes may be omitted. The Unicode values of characters are, of course, beyond the scope of this document.

The digits you enter may be freely edited, e.g. the cursor can be moved, any digit may be deleted, a new digit may be inserted, etc. In other words, making corrections doesn't require backspacing and retyping. When you're done, press Enter.

If no digits have been entered yet (or if they've all been deleted) then you'll only see the header. If, however, at least one digit has been entered then the character represented (so far) by the digit(s) is displayed just to the right, and that character's formal name is displayed on the next line.

To illustrate, let's see how a lowercase s would be indirectly typed. It's Unicode value is U+0073. In order to keep this example simple, let's skip the two leading zeroes.

Indirectly Typing the Letter s (U+0073)

  1. Press Space+u (dots 136):

    Unicode> U+
    
  2. Type the digit 7 (dots 2356):

    Unicode> U+7 ⣛
    bell
    
  3. Type the digit 3 (dots 25):

    Unicode> U+73 ⠎
    latin small letter s
    
  4. Press Enter. The prompt goes away, and the s is typed.

3.4   Braille Rendering

3.4.1   Characters

3.4.1.1   Braille Modes and Codes
3.4.1.1.1   Literary Braille

Space+6 (dots 235) selects literary braille (six dot) mode. It's the default, and is typically used for:

  • Reading books.

Characters are rendered using the currently selected braille code. Space+Dots78+g (dots 1245) displays a message (see Messages) that confirms which braille code has been selected. Space+Dot8+g (dots 1245) selects the next braille code, and Space+Dot7+g (dots 1245) selects the previous braille code. The default braille code is UEB Grade 2.

The following braille codes are supported:

  • English
    • UEB (Unified English Braille) grades 1 and 2.
    • EBAE (English Braille, American Edition) grades 1 and 2.

Highlighted words and characters are supported when not within an input area (see Input Areas) insofar as the tables that define the current braille code support them. The types of highlighting supported by the B2G User Interface are: bold, italics, and underlining.

We'd like to take this opportunity to publicly thank the LibLouis project (see http://liblouis.org/) as it's the package that's being used by the B2G User Interface to perform translation to/from literary braille.

3.4.1.1.2   Computer Braille

Space+8 (dots 236) selects computer braille (eight dot) mode. It's typically used for:

  • Computer programming.
  • When there's a need for a strict one-to-one correspondence between a character and its braille representation, e.g. to verify column alignment.

The basic characters are rendered using the North American Braille Computer Code. Internally-designed representations for Additional Common Symbols, as well as for Additional Characters for Spanish, have also been defined.

If the braille representation for a complex character (e.g. a letter with an accent) hasn't been defined, then its base character (i.e. just the letter) is displayed (unless, of course, even the base character's representation hasn't been defined).

The special character rendered as dots 3, 6, 7, and 8 [⣤] is used to represent a character that doesn't have a defined representation.

3.4.1.2   Actual Braille Cells

The characters that render in text as actual braille cells (see Unicode Braille Patterns) needn't (and, in fact, shouldn't) be defined. They're always rendered in braille as themselves.

3.4.1.3   Identifying an Unrecognized Character

If you encounter a character that you don't recognize, then you can find out what it is by holding Dot7 while pressing the cursor routing key behind that character. This will cause a description of the character to be presented within a pop-up (see Pop-ups). For example, the description for the letter s is:

latin small letter s
Code Point: U+0073
Block: basic latin
Category: lowercase letter
Directionality: left to right

3.4.2   Theme Description

3.4.2.1   Special Symbols

If a screen element (list, group of pages, etc) needs to be scrolled, then:

  • Scrolling forward (down or to the right) is indicated via the pictorial symbol ⠑⢄⡠⠊ (dots 15,38,76,24) followed by the words forward scroll.
  • Scrolling backward (up or to the left) is indicated via the pictorial symbol ⡠⠊⠑⢄ (dots 76,24,15,38) followed by the words backward scroll.

A checkbox is rendered as either dots 123478,0,145678 (⣏⠀⣹) (meaning unchecked) or dots 123478,2356,145678 (⣏⠶⣹) (meaning checked), followed by its label. For example:

⣏⠀⣹ This box is not checked.
⣏⠶⣹ This box is checked.

A switch is rendered as though it were a checkbox. The box is checked if the switch is in its on position, and unchecked if it's in its off position. For example:

⣏⠀⣹ Off
⣏⠶⣹ On

If a screen element has no text of its own, but its developer has provided a textual description of it, then that description is displayed. For example:

More options
Navigate up

If meaningful text for a screen element can't be found then it is rendered as its widget type enclosed within {braces}. For example:

{ImageButton}
{SeekBar}
3.4.2.2   Descriptive Annotations

If a control isn't enabled then the word disabled, enclosed within (parentheses), is appended to its descriptive text. For example:

OK (disabled)

When an action is performed that's neither implicitly confirmed (by an expected change on the braille display) nor explicitly confirmed (by a sound) then it's confirmed by a message (see Messages). For example:

One Hand On
Long Press Off

Whenever you move onto a password field, a message (see Messages) saying:

password field

is displayed. Also, an asterisk [*] is displayed for each character you type within it.

3.4.2.3   Input Area Indicators

Indicators are used to show where important parts of an input area (see Input Areas) are. They are dot patterns that are superimposed (or overlaid) onto the characters that they're identifying.

3.4.2.3.1   The Cursor Indicator

This indicator is superimposed onto the character where the cursor is. It's default representation is dots 7 and 8 [⣀]. This can be changed via The Settings Screen.

The actual cursor is a zero-width visual symbol that appears in between two characters such that the next character typed is inserted just to its right. Since this style of cursor representation can't be used in braille, the B2G User Interface places its cursor indicator on the character that's just to the right of the actual cursor.

The cursor isn't shown when at least one character has been selected (see Text Selection). This is because editing actions are then performed on all of the selected characters as a single unit rather than at the cursor's location.

3.4.2.3.2   The Selection Indicator

This indicator serves two purposes:

  • If text has been selected then it's superimposed onto all of those characters.
  • If text hasn't been selected then it's superimposed onto each character that's highlighted (bold, italic, strike-through, and/or underlined). You can find out exactly how a character has been highlighted by holding Dot3 while pressing the cursor routing key associated with it.

It's default representation is dot 8 [⢀]. This can be changed via The Settings Screen.

3.5   Braille-only Dialogs

A number of braille-only dialogs are used in order to directly communicate to or interact with you. They don't appear on an external video monitor.

3.5.1   Messages

Messages are used to give you feedback for significant events. These include (but aren't limited to):

  • The successful changing of a setting.
  • The timeout of a partially entered request, e.g. the control modifier has been pressed but the (then required) letter or special symbol hasn't been typed quickly enough (see Typing a Control Character).

A message is a single-line, read-only dialog. No navigation may be performed within it. It remains on the braille display for two seconds.

3.5.2   Pop-ups

Pop-ups are used to present user-requested data as well as important system information. This includes (but isn't limited to):

A pop-up is a multi-line, read-only dialog. Normal navigation may be performed within it. Dismiss it by pressing Enter. It's automatically dismissed if no navigation operations have been performed within it for 30 seconds.

3.5.3   Prompts

Prompts are used to request information from you. This includes (but isn't limited to):

A prompt is a read-write dialog. Normal navigation and editing may be performed within its response area. Press Enter once the requested information has been entered.

The prompt's header and response area are always on the first line. The B2G User Interface may add helpful information to the rest of the first line and/or to additional lines.

The response to a prompt is remembered. The response area of a prompt is initially empty, but, from then on, it's initialized to the previous response entered for that prompt. The remembered response is selected (see Text Selection) so that it can be easily replaced.

3.5.4   Action Chooser

An action chooser is a special kind of pop-up (see Pop-ups) that presents you with a list of actions and lets you choose which one to perform. For places where it's used, see:

Each line of the dialog shows one of the available actions. It contains the name of the action, the key combination that performs it (when not within the chooser), and a summary of what it does. Press Center to perform it from within the chooser. Press Enter to leave the chooser without invoking an action.

4   Features

4.1   Braille-friendly Clock

You can access a braille-friendly clock by pressing Space+t (dots 2345). The date and time are displayed on the first line using the same format currently configured for the Android clock except that it also includes seconds. The second line contains the abbreviated week day and month names, and the third line identifies the time zone. For example:

2012/02/29 10:26:53
Wed, Feb 29
EST (UTC-0500)

The four-digit number within (parentheses) on the third line is the time zone's offset, in (two-digit) hours and (two-digit) minutes, from UTC (Universal Coordinated Time). The abbreviation EST (in this example) means Eastern Standard Time (a North American time zone), which is five hours earlier (hence the minus sign [-]) than UTC.

4.2   Status Indicators

You can check various helpful status indicators by pressing Backward and Forward together. This will cause the indicators to be presented within a pop-up (see Pop-ups) that looks something like this:

Alert: Airplane Mode
Battery: 78% charging USB
SIM: MyProvider 75% GSM idle EDGE connected AccessPointName
Wi-Fi: MyNetwork 60% 54Mbps
Bluetooth: on discovering discoverable connectable

An alternate combination that's usable in One Hand Mode, Space+i (dots 24), has also been defined.

4.3   Build Details

There may be times when you need to identify the exact build of the B2G User Interface that you're currently using. For example, this information is particularly helpful when you're reporting a problem or checking if there's a newer version.

You can get this information by pressing Space, Backward, and Forward together. This will cause details that identify the build to be presented within a screen that looks something like this:

UI Package Version    1.11.24
UI Source Revision    git:4076b079460da5e1
UI Build Time         2016-03-24@01:27 UTC
Android Version       4.1.2
Android Build Name    v4.3.7
Android Build Time    2016-03-21@06:10 UTC
Android Build Type    eng
Linux Kernel Version  2.6.37
Main Firmware         4.0
Base Firmware         128.0
Metec Driver Version  1.00

An alternate combination that's usable in One Hand Mode, Space+v (dots 1236), has also been defined.

4.4   Shortcuts

4.4.1   Shortcuts to Useful Android Screens

The following shortcuts to useful Android screens are provided:

Space+p (dots 1234)
Go to the Power Off screen.
Space+Dot7+p (dots 1234)
Turn off Airplane Mode.
Space+Dot8+p (dots 1234)
Turn on Airplane Mode.
Space+? (dots 1456)
Go to the currently registered assist app. The default is Google Now.
Space+s (dots 234)

Begin a shortcut. If one of the following key combinations is entered within two seconds then the action it's bound to is immediately performed. If not, then an Action Chooser is presented that let's you pick from the following choices.

a (dot 1)
Go to the Accessibility Settings screen.
b (dots 12)
Go to the Bluetooth Settings screen.
c (dots 14)
Go to the Calendar app.
d (dots 145)
Go to the Dialer (Phone) app.
e (dots 15)
Go to the EMail app.
f (dots 124)
Go to the file manager.
g (dots 1245)
Go to the Gallery app.
m (dots 134)
Go to the Music player.
p (dots 1234)
Go to the People (Contacts) app.
s (dots 234)
Go to the Android Settings screen.
st (dots 34)
Go to the Store (Market) app.
t (dots 2345)
Go to the Text (Messaging) [SMS, MMS] app.
v (dots 1236)
Initiate an Android voice command.
w (dots 2456)
Go to the Wi-Fi Settings screen.
# (dots 3456)
Go to the Calculator app.

4.4.2   Shortcuts to Other B2G Applications

The following shortcuts to other B2G applications are provided:

Space+ed (dots 1246)
Go to the NBP editor.

Describing how any of these applications work is, of course, beyond the scope of this document.

4.5   Braille Display Options

4.5.1   The On-screen Monitor

An on-screen monitor that shows what's on the braille display can be enabled from the Braille Settings screen. It shows both the braille cells and the text.

4.5.2   Adjusting the Dot Firmness

The firmness of the braille dots can be adjusted from the Braille Settings screen.

4.5.3   Disabling the Display

The braille display is enabled by default. It can be disabled by pressing Backward+Dot1, and reenabled by pressing Forward+Dot4. Either booting the B2G or waking it up (see The Power Switch) also reenables it if speech is disabled. Braille can't be disabled while speech is disabled.

4.6   Speech

Speech is supported, and is enabled by default. Pressing Forward+VolumeUp enables it, and pressing Forward+VolumeDown disables it. Alternate combinations that are usable in One Hand Mode, which use Dot6 instead of Forward, have also been defined. Speech can't be disabled while braille is disabled (see Disabling the Display).

4.6.1   Adjusting the Speech

Adjusting the Volume:
  • Press Dot1+VolumeDown for softer.
  • Press Dot1+VolumeUp for louder.

The speech volume is set relative to the system volume. If, therefore, the speech volume is set as high as it'll go but it still sounds too soft then try increasing the system volume (by pressing VolumeUp by itself).

Adjusting the Rate:
  • Press Dot2+VolumeDown for slower.
  • Press Dot2+VolumeUp for faster.
Adjusting the Pitch:
  • Press Dot3+VolumeDown for lower.
  • Press Dot3+VolumeUp for higher.
Adjusting the Balance:
  • Press Dot4+VolumeDown for more left.
  • Press Dot4+VolumeUp for more right.

4.6.2   Reading with Speech

  • To interrupt what's currently being spoken, press Dot1+Left.
  • To hear all of the current line, press Dot1+Right.
  • To hear all of the current screen element, press Dot1+Center.
  • To hear just what's before the start of the braille display, press Dot1+Up.
  • To hear just what's on and after the braille display, press Dot1+Down.

4.6.3   Editing with Speech

  • To have the current character spoken, press Dots36. If text has been selected then all of the selected characters are spoken.
  • To have the current character spoken phonetically, long press Dots36. Long Press Mode needs to be enabled. If text has been selected then all of the selected characters are spoken phonetically.
  • To have the current word spoken, press Dots25. If text has been selected then the selected text is spoken.
  • To have the current word spelled, long press Dots25. Long Press Mode needs to be enabled. If text has been selected then the selected text is spelled.
  • To have the current line spoken, press dots14.
  • To have the current line spelled, long press dots14. Long Press Mode needs to be enabled.

When a character is spoken (or when text is being spelled), the prefix cap (meaning capital) is added if it's an uppercase letter. Additionally, if the character has any diacritics (accents) then each of their names is spoken after it (see Supported Diacritics for details). For example:

  • The letter É (an uppercase E with an acute accent) is spoken as "cap e acute".
  • The letter ǘ (a lowercase u with diaeresis and acute accents) is spoken as "u diaeresis acute".

When a character is spoken (or text is being spelled) phonetically:

  • English letters are spoken as corresponding English words so that they can be easily differentiated from one another (see English Phonetic Alphabet for details). For example, with some text-to-speech synthesizers it may be difficult to discern the difference between b and v. When spoken phonetically, however, it's easy as, respectively, they are Bravo and Victor.
  • All other characters are spoken by name.

4.6.4   Customizing What Is Spoken

There are a number of speech settings that can be used to customize how much is spoken. All of them default to on, but each of them can be individually turned off. They are:

Echo Words
Speak each word after it's been fully typed. A word is deemed to be complete as soon as a space is typed.
Echo Characters
Speak each character as it's typed. If characters are typed quickly, e.g. when pasting from the clipboard, then they may be grouped together and pronounced, for example, as a partial word.
Echo Deletions
Speak each character as it's deleted (see Input Areas). The character being deleted is spoken, followed by the word deleted. If characters are deleted quickly, e.g. when deleting a block of selected text (see Text Selection), then they may be grouped together and pronounced, for example, as a partial word.
Echo Selection
Speak changes to the start or end of the text selection. The character at the new position is spoken, followed by the phrase start of selection or end of selection.
Speak Lines
Speak the entire line either when vertical navigation explicitly switches to a new one or when horizontal navigation implicitly wraps to a new one.

4.6.5   Sleep Talk Mode

Sleep Talk Mode leaves speech active while the Power switch is off. This capability is useful when, for example, you'd like to reduce battery drain but still be informed when an important asynchronous event, e.g. the arrival of a notification, occurs.

This mode is disabled by default. Pressing Backward+VolumeUp enables it, and pressing Backward+VolumeDown disables it. Alternate combinations that are usable in One Hand Mode, which use Dot5 instead of Backward, have also been defined.

4.6.6   Differences from Braille Rendering

Speech is rendered differently than braille is in the following ways:

  • The [brackets] around screen element descriptions provided by application developers aren't spoken.
  • The {braces} around screen element types aren't spoken.
  • A space is inserted in between each pair of a lowercase letter followed by an uppercase letter within screen element types in order to improve the way that each implied word is pronounced. For example, SeekBar is spoken as Seek Bar.
  • The (parentheses) around screen element states aren't spoken.
  • The state of a checkbox (or switch) is spoken as either checked or not checked.

4.7   The Remote Braille Display

The B2G can be used as a remote braille display for a desktop, a laptop, another mobile device, etc. A screen reader that supports braille devices must be running on the other system.

Configuration of the screen reader that's running on the other system is beyond the scope of this manual. Here, however, are some technical details that you may need to know when configuring it:

  • The remote braille display communicates with the screen reader via Bluetooth. The B2G will probably need to be paired with the other system before the screen reader can use it.
  • The remote braille display emulates the Baum protocol. Other names that the screen reader may use for this protocol include (but aren't limited to): Vario, RBT, Braille Connect, Conny
  • The remote braille display identifies itself to the screen reader as being a Conny model in order to hint as to which keys it can emulate.

The remote braille display stays active in the background when you aren't using it, i.e. while you're using Android. This enables it to immediately show up-to-date braille content whenever you switch to it, even if the screen reader you're using doesn't support a request to refresh the braille display.

The remote braille display shows one of the following messages when it's not connected to a screen reader:

remote display off
The remote braille display hasn't been enabled.
Bluetooth off
The remote braille display has been enabled but Bluetooth hasn't been turned on.
Bluetooth waiting
The remote braille display is waiting for a screen reader on another system to connect to it via Bluetooth.

Pressing Space+Dots78 switches to the remote braille display. When switched to it, it owns all of the B2G's navigation keys. The B2G User Interface still owns the volume controls (on the right side). Pressing either of them separately still controls the level of Android's current audio stream. Pressing both of them together switches back to Android.

4.7.1   Relevant Settings

The following settings (on The Settings Screen) pertain to the remote braille display:

Remote Display
A checkbox that enables (checked) and disables (unchecked) the remote braille display. It's disabled by default.
Secure Connection
A checkbox that enables (checked) and disables (unchecked) secure Bluetooth connection capabilities. When enabled, the connection is guaranteed to be authenticated and encrypted. It's disabled by default because some systems, Bluetooth adapters, etc (especially older ones) don't support these capabilities. You may need to try both settings.

4.7.2   Baum Key Emulation

The Baum device that the remote braille display emulates has the following keys:

  • A cursor routing key immediately behind each of the braille cells.
  • Three display keys at each end of the braille cells. The three on the left, from top to bottom, are D1, D2, and D3. The three on the right, from top to bottom, are D4, D5, and D6.
  • A standard, eight-dot braille keyboard behind the cursor routing keys. The four on the left, from left to right, are dots 7, 3, 2, and 1. The four on the right, from left to right, are dots 4, 5, 6, and 8. These keys are also known as B1 through B8 (numbered the same way as the dots).
  • A five-position joystick in the middle of the front. Its positions are Left, Right, Up, Down, and Press.
  • A button on each side of the joystick. The one on the left is B9, and the one on the right is B10.
  • Two function buttons at each end of the front. The two on the left, from left to right, are F1 and F2. The two on the right, from left to right, are F3 and F4.
  • A button in between dots 1 and 4 named B11.

The B2G's cursor routing keys are always mapped to the Baum cursor routing keys.

The B2G's five-key directional pad is always mapped to the Baum five-position joystick.

The B2G's eight dot keys, as well as its Backward, Forward, and Space keys, are mapped according to one of the following operational modes:

4.7.2.1   Baum Navigation Mode

Pressing Space while holding Backward switches to navigation mode. This is the default. In it, the keys are mapped as follows:

  • Dots 1 through 6 are mapped to Display keys 1 through 6.
  • Dots 7 and 8 are mapped to Function keys 2 and 3.
  • Backward and Forward are mapped to Function keys 1 and 4.
  • Space isn't mapped.
4.7.2.2   Baum Keyboard Mode

Pressing Space while holding Forward switches to keyboard mode. In it, the keys are mapped as follows:

  • Dots 1 through 8 are mapped to B1 through B8 (the braille keyboard)).
  • Backward and Forward are mapped to B9 and B10.
  • Space is mapped to B11.

4.8   The Settings Screen

Pressing Space+o (dots 135) takes you to the Settings screen for the B2G User Interface.

The first line contains the following buttons:

Save Settings
Save the current settings for later restoration. This is a good way to checkpoint the configuration that you're most comfortable with.
Restore Settings
Restore the settings that were most recently saved. This is how to get back to the configuration that you were most comfortable with.
Reset to Defaults
Restore the settings to an internally-defined configuration. This is how to recover if, for example, you've accidentally messed up your saved settings.
System Maintenance
Go to The System Maintenance Screen.

Each subsequent line contains the name of a settings category. Pressing Center on any of them goes to a screen that contains the settings belonging to the corresponding category. Each line on that screen contains a setting that can be changed which is laid out in columns as follows:

  1. This column contains the name of the setting.
  2. For a boolean setting, this column contains an on/off switch. For any other kind of setting, it shows the setting's current value.
  3. For numeric settings, this column contains a button that decreases its value. For settings that have discrete values, this column contains a Change button that brings up a dialog from which the desired value can be selected.
  4. For numeric settings, this column contains a button that increases its value.

The settings categories are as follows:

4.8.1   General Settings

General Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Literary Braille On Off, On  
Braille Code UEB G2 UEB/EBAE G2/G1 ... Change
Word Wrap On Off, On  
Notifications On Off, On  

4.8.2   Input Settings

Input Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Typing Text Text, Cells Change
Bold Off Off, On  
Italic Off Off, On  
Strike Off Off, On  
Underline Off Off, On  

4.8.3   Braille Settings

Braille Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Show Highlighted On Off, On  
Selection Indicator Dot8 Dots78, Dot7, Dot8 Change
Cursor Indicator Dots78 Dots78, Dot7, Dot8 Change
Braille Firmness Medium Lowest - Highest Change
Braille Monitor Off Off, On  
Braille Display On Off, On  

4.8.4   Speech Settings

Speech Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Speech On Off, On  
Echo Words On Off, On  
Echo Characters On Off, On  
Echo Deletions On Off, On  
Echo Selection On Off, On  
Speak Lines On Off, On  
Volume 10 0 - 10 Softer, Louder
Rate 0 -10 - 10 Slower, Faster
Pitch 0 -10 - 10 Lower, Higher
Balance Center Left100% - Right100% More Left, More Right
Sleep Talk Off Off, On  

4.8.5   Keyboard Settings

Keyboard Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Long Presses On Off, On  
Reverse Panning Off Off, On  

4.8.6   One Hand Settings

One Hand Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
One Hand Mode Off Off, On  
Space Timeout 1s 0.5s - 5s Shorter, Longer
Pressed Timeout 15s 5s - 1m Shorter, Longer

4.8.7   Remote Settings

Remote Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Remote Display Off Off, On  
Secure Connection Off Off, On  

4.8.8   Developer Settings

Developer Settings
Setting Default Choices Buttons
Computer Braille local local, en, ...  
Crash Emails Off Off, On  
Advanced Actions Off Off, On  
Extra Indicators Off Off, On  
Event Messages Off Off, On  
Log Actions Off Off, On  
Log Navigation Off Off, On  
Log Updates Off Off, On  
Log Keyboard Off Off, On  
Log Emulations Off Off, On  
Log Braille Off Off, On  
Log Speech Off Off, On  

4.9   The System Maintenance Screen

Pressing Space+Dots78+m (dots 134) takes you to the System Maintenance screen for the B2G User Interface.

A text area at the top of the screen is used to show progress information for the currently running (or most recently performed) operation. This text area is initially empty. The list of available operations is below it.

4.9.1   Maintenance Operations

The following operations may be performed:

Restart System
Reboot the B2G.
Update User Interface
Upgrade to the latest version of the B2G User Interface. See Updating Applications for details. This operation requires access to the Internet. Standard data charges may apply.
Update Editor
Upgrade to the latest version of the NBP editor. See Updating Applications for details. This operation requires access to the Internet. Standard data charges may apply.
Update Calculator
Upgrade to the latest version of the NBP calculator. See Updating Applications for details. This operation requires access to the Internet. Standard data charges may apply.
Update Navigator
Upgrade to the latest version of the NBP navigator. See Updating Applications for details. This operation requires access to the Internet. Standard data charges may apply.
Verify System Update
Verify a System Update without applying it. A File Picker will be invoked so that you can locate and select the needed file.
Update System
Apply a System Update. A File Picker will be invoked so that you can locate and select the needed file. The B2G will be temporarily rebooted into Recovery Mode.
Recovery Mode
Reboot the B2G into Recovery Mode.
View Recovery Log
View the log of the most recent reboot of the B2G into Recovery Mode.
Clear Cache
Reinitialize the system cache partition. The B2G will be temporarily rebooted into Recovery Mode.
Factory Reset
Reinitialize the user data and system cache partitions. The B2G will be temporarily rebooted into Recovery Mode.
Boot Loader
Reboot the B2G into its Boot Loader.

4.9.2   Updating Applications

  1. You'll be asked to choose a package downloader. We recommend ES Downloader.
  2. When the download is complete, select Open File. You'll then see lots of information about the package. Compare the new version of the package with that of the already-installed one. Select Install if you wish to proceed or Cancel if not.
  3. You'll be asked to choose a package installer. We recommend Package Installer.
  4. You'll be asked to confirm that you really want to replace the currently-installed version with the new one.
  5. You may be asked to confirm that the application should be allowed to perform various privileged system operations.
  6. The currently running version will be replaced by the new one. If the application is running then it'll be stopped. If you're updating the B2G User Interface then it'll be restarted, so don't worry if the keys stop responding and the display goes blank for a moment.
  7. Click Done to clear the confirmation screen.

4.9.3   System Update

System updates are also known as OTA (over-the-air) updates. They're used to update either the whole Android system or just parts of it.

A system update is a .zip file that contain special meta-data (including an electronic signature).

4.9.4   File Picker

Some of the maintenance operations require you to choose a file. Android refers to the type of application that enables you to choose a file as a file picker.

If you haven't used a file picker yet, or if you haven't yet chosen your favourite one, then you'll be presented with a list of the file pickers that are currently installed on the B2G, and be asked to select the one that the action should be completed with. We recommend ES File Explorer.

Select the one you'd like to use (or just try) by clicking on it, and then click on one of the buttons at the bottom:

Always
This button will make your selection permanent. Only make this choice if you're absolutely sure that you've made the right selection.
Once
This button makes your selection temporary. You'll be presented with this dialog again the next time you need a file picker. Make this choice if you're not sure yet or if you're still trying them out.

5   Screen Navigation

5.1   Emulating the Android Keys

All Android devices have a number of special keys. There are two ways to emulate each of them:

  • With two hands, by pressing Space together with a related letter or special symbol. While these may be easier to remember, they're also less convenient because both hands must be removed from the display.
  • With one hand, by pressing Dot4 together with one of the D-Pad keys.
Special Android Keys
Key Two Hand Version One Hand Version
Home Space+Dots123456 Dot4+Down
Back Space+z (dots 1356) Dot4+Left
Notifications Space+n (dots 1345) Dot4+Up
Recent Apps Space+r (dots 1235) Dot4+Right
Menu Space+m (dots 134) Dot4+Center

A braille-friendly version of the Apps drawer (usually found on the favourites bar of the home screen) can be accessed by pressing Space+g (dots 1245).

5.2   Emulating Screen Gestures

To tap (or click) the current screen element, press Center. Another (traditional) way to do it is to press The Enter Key.

To hold (or long click) the current screen element, press Space+Center.

5.7   Input Areas

The character where the cursor is is highlighted via dots 7 and 8 [⣀].

Pressing a cursor routing key brings the cursor to that character. If text has been selected then the selection is cleared.

An additional blank character is rendered at the end of each line within an input area. This character represents the delimiter between a line and the one that follows it.

  • Typing while the cursor is on it appends characters to the line.
  • Deleting it joins the line to the start of the next one.

When a character is typed (see Typing Characters), then:

  • If text hasn't been selected then the typed character is inserted just to the left of the cursor.
  • If text has been selected then the typed character replaces the selected text.

5.7.1   The Enter Key within an Input Area

The Enter key is Dot8. If the input area supports more than one line then this key ends the current line and starts a new one.

  • Pressing it when at the start of a line inserts an empty line just above it.
  • Pressing it when in the middle of a line splits that line just to the left of the cursor.
  • Pressing it when at the end of a line starts a new line just below it.

5.7.2   Deleting Characters

The Backspace key is Dot7.

  • If text hasn't been selected then the character just to the left of the cursor is deleted. If this key is pressed when at the start of a line then that line is joined to the end of the previous one.
  • If text has been selected then the selected text is deleted.

The Delete key is Space+d (dots 145).

  • If text hasn't been selected then the character where the cursor is is deleted. If this key is pressed when at the end of a line then that line is joined to the start of the next one.
  • If text has been selected then the selected text is deleted.

5.7.3   Deleting Words

These actions only work when there's a cursor. If text has been selected then they don't do anything.

  • Add Dot7 to Space+d to delete the previous word.
  • Add Dot8 to Space+d to delete the next (or current) word.

If the cursor is on space then all of that space is also deleted. If the cursor is within a word (not on its first character) then, rather than deleting the previous/next word, these actions delete the start/end of the current word. Here are the specifics:

Pressing Space+Dot7+d (dots 145) deletes the previous word.

  • If the cursor is on a word, but not on its first character, then the characters of that word to the left of the cursor are removed.
  • If the cursor is on the first character of a word, or if it's on space after a word, then the previous word, along with all the space after it, is removed.
  • If the cursor is on space at the start of a line then all of that space is removed.

Pressing Space+Dot8+d (dots 145) deletes the next word.

  • If the cursor is on the first character of a word then that word, along with all the space after it, is removed.
  • If the cursor is on any other character (except the first) of a word then the characters of that word to the right of the cursor are removed.
  • If the cursor is on space before a word then that word, along with all the space before it, is removed.
  • If the cursor is on space at the end of a line then all of that space is removed.

5.7.4   Panning within an Input Area

The Forward and Backward keys pan through an input area in the expected way:

  • The Forward key pans to the right, and, at the end of each line, wraps to the start of the next one. At the end of the last line it moves to the start of the next screen element.
  • The Backward key pans to the left, and, at the start of each line, wraps to the end of the previous one. At the start of the first line it moves to the start of the previous screen element.

Pressing Space+Dots17 pans the braille display such that its first character corresponds to:

  • If text hasn't been selected then the cursor's location.
  • If text has been selected then the first selected character.

Pressing Space+Dots48 pans the braille display such that its last character corresponds to:

  • If text hasn't been selected then the cursor's location.
  • If text has been selected then the last selected character.

5.7.5   The Directional Keys within an Input Area

The directional keys move the cursor through the text, one step at a time. They will not leave the input area. The braille display is panned, as needed, such that the cursor is always visible.

The Left key moves the cursor to the previous character. If it's at the start of a line then it wraps to the end of the previous line. If text has been selected then the cursor is moved to just before the first selected character, and the selection is cleared.

The Right key moves the cursor to the next character. If it's at the end of a line then it wraps to the start of the next line. If text has been selected then the cursor is moved to just after the last selected character, and the selection is cleared.

The Up key moves the cursor to the same position on the previous line. If that line is too short then the cursor is also moved leftward. If text has been selected then the cursor is moved to just above the first selected character, and the selection is cleared.

The Down key moves the cursor to the same position on the next line. If that line is too short then the cursor is also moved leftward. If text has been selected then the cursor is moved to just below the last selected character, and the selection is cleared.

5.7.6   Traditional Key Combinations within an Input Area

The B2G User Interface supports input area navigation via dot key chords that are commonly used by other products (screen readers, note takers, etc).

5.7.6.1   Space + Dot3
  • If text hasn't been selected then move the cursor one character to the left. If it's at the start of a line then wrap it to the end of the previous line.
  • If text has been selected then move the cursor to the first selected character and then clear the selection.
5.7.6.2   Space + Dot6
  • If text hasn't been selected then move the cursor one character to the right. If it's at the end of a line then wrap it to the start of the next line.
  • If text has been selected then move the cursor to the character just after it and then clear the selection.
5.7.6.3   Space + Dots36
  • If text hasn't been selected then speak the current character.
  • If text has been selected then speak each of the selected characters.
5.7.6.4   Long Press of Space + Dots36
  • If text hasn't been selected then speak the current character phonetically.
  • If text has been selected then speak each of the selected characters phonetically.

Long Press Mode needs to be enabled.

5.7.6.5   Space + Dot2

Move the cursor to the start of the current word. If it's at the start of a word then move it to the start of the previous word.

5.7.6.6   Space + Dot5

Move the cursor to the start of the next word.

5.7.6.7   Space + Dots25
  • If text hasn't been selected then speak the current word.
  • If text has been selected then speak the selected text.
5.7.6.8   Long Press of Space + Dots25
  • If text hasn't been selected then spell the current word.
  • If text has been selected then spell the selected text.

Long Press Mode needs to be enabled.

5.7.6.9   Space + Dot1
  • If text hasn't been selected then move the cursor one line up. Vertical cursor motion within text may cause it to also move unexpectedly left or right in braille, especially when a proportional font has been used, because the characters on the screen may not all have the same width.
  • If text has been selected then move the cursor to the first selected character and then clear the selection.
5.7.6.10   Space + Dot4
  • If text hasn't been selected then move the cursor one line down. Vertical cursor motion within text may cause it to also move unexpectedly left or right in braille, especially when a proportional font has been used, because the characters on the screen may not all have the same width.
  • If text has been selected then move the cursor to the character just after it and then clear the selection.
5.7.6.11   Space + Dots14

Speak the current line.

5.7.6.12   Long Press of Space + Dots14

Spell the current line.

Long Press Mode needs to be enabled.

5.7.6.13   Space + Dots23

Move the cursor to the start of the first line of the current paragraph. If it's on the first line of a paragraph then move it to the start of the first line of the previous paragraph.

5.7.6.14   Space + Dots56

Move the cursor to the start of the first line of the next paragraph.

5.7.6.15   Space + Dots13

Move the cursor to the start of the current line.

5.7.6.16   Space + Dots46

Move the cursor to the end of the current line.

5.7.6.17   Space + Dots123

Move the cursor to the start of the first line.

5.7.6.18   Space + Dots456

Move the cursor to the end of the last line.

5.7.7   Password Fields

If the input area is a password field (one in which the characters being typed don't appear) then the B2G User Interface automatically switches to Computer Braille (see Typing in Computer Braille). This is done because it's extremely difficult to accurately enter a password in Literary Braille, especially when it contains special characters and/or when a braille code that defines contractions is being used.

The message (see Messages):

password field

is displayed whenever you move onto a password field in order to alert you that you won't be able to read what you're typing and that you need to be typing in computer braille.

5.8   Text Selection

Each character within the current text selection is highlighted via dot 8 [⢀]. If text has been selected then the cursor isn't shown.

Selecting text is useful in at least the following ways:

  • Typing a character deletes the selected text, puts the cursor where the selected text was, and then inserts the typed character at that point. This, in other words, is an efficient way to replace old text with new text. Just select the old text, and then start typing the new text.
  • Pressing any of the delete keys (see Deleting Characters) removes all of the selected text. This, in other words, is an efficient way to delete a block of text. Just select it, and then delete it.

A quick way to select all of the characters within the input area is to press Space+Dot8+a (dot 1).

Any subset of the characters within the input area can be selected by following these steps:

  1. If necessary, use the Forward and Backward keys to pan to a place where the first character to be selected can be seen.
  2. Hold Backward while pressing the cursor routing key behind the character that's to start the selection.
  3. If necessary, use the Forward and Backward keys to pan to a place where the last character to be selected can be seen.
  4. Hold Forward while pressing the cursor routing key behind the character that's to end the selection.

Steps 1 and 2 may be reperformed at any time in order to change the start of the selection. Likewise, steps 3 and 4 may be reperformed at any time in order to change the end of the selection. In fact, the end of the selection can be set before the start of the selection has been set, i.e. steps 3 and 4 may be performed before steps 1 and 2 have been performed.

If the start of the selection is set first, and if the cursor is after that character, then the selection is implicitly extended forward to (but not including) the character where the cursor is. This, for example, provides an easy way to delete or replace several characters that have just been typed.

If the end of the selection is set first, and if the cursor is before that character, then the selection is implicitly extended back to (and including) the character where the cursor is. This, for example, provides an easy way to replace a word, line, paragraph, etc.

Alternate combinations that are usable in One Hand Mode have been defined. They use:

  • Dot1 instead of Backward to set the start of the selection
  • Dot4 instead of Forward to set the end of the selection

5.9   The Clipboard

The clipboard is a central system resource that facilitates the easy sharing of text between applications. Text is first moved (cut, copied, added) to the clipboard, and then pasted into an input area. Since pasting text doesn't remove it from the clipboard, the same text may be pasted any number of times.

The B2G User Interface uses the three traditional keyboard letters (x, c, v), in combination with Space and either Dot7 or Dot8, to manage the clipboard. The Dot8 combinations perform the traditional actions (cut, copy, paste), and the Dot7 combinations perform extended actions (clear, add, show). Here's a summary:

Key Combinations for Managing the Clipboard
Combination Dot8 Dot7
Space+x+ Cut Clear
Space+c+ Copy Add
Space+v+ Paste Show
Show
Press Space+Dot7+v (dots 1236) to check what's current on the clipboard. It's presented within a pop-up (see Pop-ups).
Clear
Press Space+Dot7+x (dots 1346) to clear (erase what's on) the clipboard.

Copy and Add

  • Press Space+Dot8+c (dots 14) to copy text to the clipboard. The current clipboard content is replaced.
  • Press Space+Dot7+c (dots 14) to add text to the clipboard. The new text is appended to (added to the end of) the text that's already on the clipboard.

If this is done when not within an input area, or when within an input area with no selected text, then all of the text is copied (or added). If this is done within an input area with selected text then just that text is copied (or added).

To copy (or add) part of the text to the clipboard when not within an input area:

  1. Move to a place where the first character is visible.
  2. Hold Backward and press the cursor routing key behind the first character.
  3. Move to a place where the last character is visible.
  4. Hold Forward and press the cursor routing key behind the last character. The text from the first character through the last character (inclusive) will be copied (or added) to the clipboard. This step will fail if:
    • The first character hasn't been set.
    • The last character is before the first character.

Note that these same steps work somewhat differently within an input area (see Text Selection).

Cut

Press Space+Dot8+x (dots 1346) to cut text to the clipboard. This can only be done within an input area. The text is removed from the input area and replaces the current clipboard content.

  • If text hasn't been selected then all of the text is cut.
  • If text has been selected then just that text is cut.
Paste

Press Space+Dot8+v (dots 1236) to paste the text that's currently on the clipboard into an input area.

  • If text hasn't been selected then the clipboard content is inserted just to the left of the cursor.
  • If text has been selected then the clipboard content replaces the selected text.

5.10   Sliders

A slider is a control that intuitively (from a visual perspective) represents a numeric value (distance, magnitude, etc). It's often used, for example, to represent a volume control, the current position within a song, etc.

Each time the slider is adjusted, a brief message is displayed that announces its new position (as a percentage). Unfortunately, due to a current system limitation, its current position can't be determined (without actually looking at it on the screen). It's necessary, therefore, to adjust its position back and forth in order to figure out what it is.

Attempting to either increase a slider's position beyond its maximum or decrease its position beyond its minimum neither displays a position message nor indicates an error.

5.10.1   The Directional Keys When on a Slider

A slider is normally adjusted by tapping the desired point along it's bar. This, of course, can't be done on a device that doesn't have a touch screen. Instead, use the Left and Right directional keys (on the D-Pad) to adjust it.

  • The Left key decreases its position.
  • The Right key increases its position.
  • The Up and Down keys don't do anything.

5.11   Finding Text within the Current Screen Element

To find a sequence of words within the text that's associated with the current screen element, press Space+f (dots 124). This brings up a prompt (see Prompts) with the following header:

find>

Enter one or more words (sequences of non-space characters) separated by spaces. The same words must occur together, in the same order, within the text. You don't need to know how many spaces are between each pair of words within the text because however many spaces you enter will match any number of spaces within the text. You also don't need to know which letters are in uppercase and which are in lowercase because the search isn't case sensitive.

The first word you enter need only match the end of the corresponding word within the text. Likewise, the last word you enter need only match the start of the corresponding word within the text. Enter a leading space to force the first word to match an entire word. Likewise, enter a trailing space to force the last word to match an entire word.

These same rules apply if you enter a single word. Since it's both the first and the last word, it need only match part (the start, middle, or end) of a word within the text. Enter a leading space to force it to match to start of a word, a trailing space to force it to match the end of a word, and both to force it to match an entire word.

You can edit the word(s) that you're entering. Press Enter when you're done.

A forward search through the text is performed. If a match is found then the braille display is repositioned to where it starts.

The following convenience key combinations have also been defined:

Space+Dot8+f (dots 124):
Search forward through the text for the next match.
Space+Dot7+f (dots 124):
Search backward through the text for the previous match.

5.11.1   Following a Reference

Since the find prompt is an input area, the current clipboard content can be pasted into it. This capability makes it fairly easy to follow a reference (see, see also, etc).

The first step is to copy the reference to the clipboard:

  1. Move to where the start of the reference is visible.
  2. Hold Backward while pressing the cursor routing key behind its first character.
  3. Move to where the end of the reference is visible.
  4. Hold Forward while pressing the cursor routing key behind its last character.

The second step is to search through the text for a match:

  1. Press Space+f (dots 124) to bring up the find prompt.
  2. Press Space+Dot8+v (dots 1236) to paste the reference into the response.
  3. Press Enter (dot 8) to search forward for the reference.

The next match may, of course, be another reference rather than the referenced header. You may, therefore, need to continue searching further forward with Space+Dot8+f (dots 124), or to search backward with Space+Dot7+f (dots 124).

5.12   Dragging Screen Elements

Some screens allow their elements to be moved around. This, for example, is how The Standard Android Launcher allows users to reorganize The Home Screen.

Moving a screen element to a new location is normally done by dragging it with a finger or mouse. The B2G User Interface supports a set of simple drag operations.

  • Holding Dot5 while pressing one of the four edges of the directional pad drags the current screen element one position in the intended direction.

  • Holding Dot5 while pressing Center initiates a drag of the current screen element to an unrelated location. To complete the drag, navigate to the screen element that's nearest to the new location, and then hold Dot6 while pressing one of the five keys on the directional pad:

    Left

    Drag it to immediately left of the new screen element.

    Right

    Drag it to immediately right of the new screen element.

    Up

    Drag it to immediately above the new screen element.

    Down

    Drag it to immediately below the new screen element.

    Center

    Drag it on top of the new screen element.

6   Important Screens

6.1   The Home Screen

The home screen is the main Android screen from which apps are launched. It's the screen that first comes up after Android has booted, and you can always get back to it either by pressing Space + Dots123456 or by pressing Down while holding Dot4.

The home screen is managed by a special kind of app known as a launcher. The B2G is initially configured to use The Standard Android Launcher. This, as is true for most Android capabilities, can be changed but that's beyond the scope of this document.

6.1.1   Adding and Removing Shortcuts

Regardless of which launcher is being used, the B2G User Interface supports the following home screen management operations:

  • To add a shortcut to the home screen:
    1. Go to a list of all the apps currently installed on the B2G. The easiest way to do this is to press Space+g (dots 1245). To do it via The Standard Android Launcher:
      1. Go to the home screen.
      2. Open the Apps drawer (on the favourites bar).
    2. Navigate to the app that you'd like to add.
    3. Press Space+Dot8+home (dots 123456).
  • To remove a shortcut from the home screen:
    1. Go to the home screen.
    2. Navigate to the shortcut that you'd like to remove.
    3. Press Space+Dot7+home (dots 123456).

If you'd rather not search for the app then find an empty line within any input area (see Input Areas) and type it. You only need to type enough characters to uniquely identify it among all of the apps that are currently installed on the B2G. Letters can be in either lower or upper case, and they don't need to be at the beginning or end of the name.

When you're finished typing, press the key combination for the shortcut action that you'd like to perform (see above). If the characters match more than one app then the list will be presented within a pop-up (see Pop-ups). If this happens then navigate to the one you'd like to add or remove, and press Center.

6.1.2   The Standard Android Launcher

The standard Android launcher allows you to switch between five home screens. Each of them has a search area at the left, a favourites bar at the right, and a large, customizable area in the middle.

The default home screen is the middle one [Home Screen 3]. Pressing Android's home key (either Space + Dots123456 or pressing Down while holding Dot4) when on any other home screen goes to this one. In other words, pressing Android's home key twice guarantees that you're on the default home screen.

The search area (at the left), as it's rendered in braille, has a Search icon at the very top and a Voice Search icon at the very bottom. On an actual screen, there's an input area at the top that contains the text being searched for, and the space between it and the Voice Search icon (at the bottom) is where the search results appear.

The favourites bar (at the right) is a vertically-oriented set of shortcuts and/or folders. It also contains the Apps drawer which, when clicked, brings up an alphabetically sorted list of all of the apps that are currently installed on the device. Up to two shortcuts and/or folders may be above the Apps drawer, and up to two may be below it. The favourites bar should contain your most frequently used apps because, although it's customizable, it's the same on all of the home screens.

The customizable area (in the middle) occupies most of each home screen. A new shortcut is added to the customizable area of the home screen nearest to the default one that isn't full. When there's a choice, preference is given to the home screen with the higher number.

In addition to Adding and Removing Shortcuts, you can also reorganize this area by dragging the shortcuts within it to new locations. See Dragging Screen Elements for instructions on how to do this via the B2G User Interface.

A shortcut can also be dragged to, from, or along the favourites bar.

6.1.2.1   Folders

In addition to moving shortcuts around, you can also create folders so that the shortcuts can be organized into meaningful groups. In order to launch an app that's within a folder, you need to first click on the folder to open it, and to then click on that app's shortcut within the opened folder. Press Back to close an opened folder without launching an app within it.

An opened folder also has an input area (see Input Areas) that contains its current name. Editing the text within this area renames the folder. A newly created folder has no name.

Folder-related operations include:

  • Dragging a shortcut on top of another one creates a new folder that contains both of them.
  • Dragging a shortcut on top of a folder adds it to that folder.
  • Dragging a shortcut within an opened folder reorganizes that folder.
  • Dragging a shortcut out of an opened folder removes it from that folder.

A folder can be dragged within the customizable area, as well as to, from, or along the favourites bar.

A folder can only contain shortcuts - it can't contain a folder.

6.1.2.2   Keyboard Navigation
The Enter Key
If the current item is a shortcut then launch the app. If it's a folder then open it.
The Cursor Left Key
Go to the previous item on the current line. If on the first item of a line then go to the last item on the same line of the nearest previous home screen that isn't empty.
The Cursor Right Key
Go to the next item on the current line. If on the last item of a line then go to the first item on the same line of the nearest next home screen that isn't empty.
The Cursor Up Key
Go to the nearest item on the previous line.
The Cursor Down Key
Go to the nearest item on the next line.
The Page Up Key
Go to the first item on the nearest previous home screen that isn't empty. If on the first non-empty home screen then go to its first item.
The Page Down Key
Go to the first item on the nearest next home screen that isn't empty. If on the last non-empty home screen then go to its last item.
The Home Key
Go to the first item on the current home screen.
The End Key
Go to the last item on the current home screen.

6.1.3   Initial B2G Home Screen Content

The favourites bar, from top to bottom, initially contains:

  1. The Chrome web browser.
  2. The NBP editor.
  3. The Apps drawer.
  4. The Google People (Contacts) app.
  5. The Google Calendar app.

The customizable area of Home Screen 3 initially contains:

  • A clock (in the middle, at the top).
  • ES File Explorer (toward the left, at the bottom).
  • The Android Settings app (toward the right, at the bottom).

The customizable area of the other home screens is initially empty.

7   Recovery Mode

Recovery Mode is a single-user environment within which system maintenance can be performed safely. The B2G User Interface isn't available in Recovery Mode. Braille access in Recovery Mode is provided by BRLTTY (see http://brltty.com).

BRLTTY's key bindings for the B2G are different than those defined by the B2G User Interface. Describing them is beyond the scope of this document - please see http://brltty.com/doc/KeyBindings/brl-bg-all.html.

Android's visual Recovery Mode menu can still be used, though braille must first be disabled. Those who prefer to use an external video monitor must press both volume keys together (VolumeDown + VolumeUp) in order to stop BRLTTY's B2G braille driver. The B2G keyboard can then be used to navigate the visual menu.

7.1   The Action Menu

The braille menu offers the same functionality as the visual menu but in a different way because it's been designed for a text-mode environment. When it starts, it shows a list summarizing the actions that can be selected, and then presents the prompt:

recovery>

To select an action, type its name and then press Enter. Unambiguous abbreviations of action names are recognized. Leading and/or trailing spaces are ignored. Entering an empty line redisplays the action summary.

7.1.1   The Boot Action

This action reboots to Android. It requires User Confirmation.

7.1.2   The Clear Action

This action wipes /cache (the system cache partition), and then reboots to Android. It requires User Confirmation.

7.1.3   The Details Action

Display information about the current build. For example:

Type: user
Build: v4.2.9
Kernel: 2.6.37
Firmware: v3.1
Hardware: armv7l

7.1.4   The Exit Action

This action terminates this menu. It requires User Confirmation. It's only available within an engineering build.

Once terminated, it's not that easy to restart the menu. This action has only been defined so that the B2G developers can easily test changes to the menu.

7.1.5   The Log Action

This action uses the vi editor to view the log for the current Recovery Mode session. The edit session is read-only in order to prevent any changes from being saved (written back) to the log.

Type :q followed by Enter to exit the edit session. If you've accidentally made any changes to the read-only edit buffer then you'll need to use :q! instead.

7.1.6   The Off Action

This action powers down the B2G. It requires User Confirmation.

7.1.7   The Reset Action

This action performs a factory reset, and then reboots to Android. It requires User Confirmation.

Both /cache (the system cache partition) and /data (the user data partition) are wiped.

7.1.8   The Shell Action

This action starts an interactive Unix-style shell. It's only available within an engineering build.

Use the shell's exit command to return to this menu.

7.1.9   The Time Action

Display the current date and time. The format is yyyy-mm-dd@hh:mm:ss. For example:

2015-12-07@09:43:26

7.1.10   The Update Action

This action applies a System Update, and then reboots to Android. It requires User Confirmation.

You must first choose the update that you'd like to apply via The File System Browser (which is automatically started for you).

7.2   The File System Browser

The file system browser is used to look through the file system in order to find the file that's to be processed by the currently selected action. It's used, for example, by The Update Action.

When the file system browser starts, it shows a list summarizing The Navigation Keys, and then presents The Top-Level Folder List.

Only the current entry of the current folder is displayed. The line containing it is always rewritten, so the navigation key summary is always just above it for easy reference.

A single-character indicator is appended to the name of the current file system entry that describes what it is. The indicators are:

Recovery Mode File System Browser Type Indicators
Indicator Type
/ folder (directory)
* executable file
| FIFO (named pipe)
= socket
% character device
$ block device
@ symbolic link
? unknown

7.2.1   The Top-Level Folder List

The top-level folder list contains the volumes that can be browsed. They are:

  • /storage/sdcard0 (the internal memory partition)
  • /storage/sdcard1 (the removable SD card)
  • /cache (the system cache partition)
  • /data (the user data partition)

7.2.2   The Navigation Keys

The following B2G keys can be used to browse the file system:

Dot1
Go up to the previous entry within the current folder.
Dot4
Go down to the next entry within the current folder.
Dot2
Go back to the parent folder (equivalent to .. within the visual file system browser). If within The Top-Level Folder List then exit the file system browser without choosing a file.
Dot5
If the current entry is a folder then go into it. If it's a file then choose it and exit the file system browser.
Dot3
Exit the file system browser without choosing a file.

7.3   User Confirmation

Some actions require user confirmation. The prompt is a brief description of the action that's to be performed, followed by a question mark (?). Your response may be:

yes (or any abbreviation thereof)
The action is performed.
no (or any abbreviation thereof)
The action is cancelled.
anything else
The confirmation prompt is reissued.

7.4   Booting into Recovery Mode

There are a number of ways to boot the B2G into Recovery Mode:

  • Via the B2G User Interface:

    1. Go to The Settings Screen:

      Space + o (dots 135)
      
    2. Go to The System Maintenance Screen:

      Space + Dots78 + m (dots 134)
      
    3. Click on Recovery Mode.

  • When the B2G is fully shut down:

    1. Press and hold VolumeDown.
    2. Slide The Power Switch to its on position.
    3. Continue to hold VolumeDown until Starting appears on the braille display.
  • For developer builds (the super-user shell capability is disabled in user builds):

    1. Start an interactive shell on the B2G with the Android SDK command:

      adb shell
      
    2. Reboot the B2G into Recovery Mode with the command:

      reboot recovery
      
  • Via The Serial Port:

    1. Reboot the B2G into Recovery Mode with the u-boot command:

      run recoverycmd
      

8   Firmware Features

8.1   Status Alerts

A high-pitched beep (approximately 4KHz) is used to alert you to a number of firmware-detected states.

Beep Lengths
Length Duration
Short 100ms
Medium 500ms
Long 1s
One Short Beep
The system has started booting. This occurs immediately after the Power switch has been turned on while the system is shut down. The braille display is not powered up until later.
Two Short Beeps
The kernel has finished initializing. This occurs part way through the system's boot sequence. The braille display is powered up at this point. It will say Starting for a few seconds, and then go blank. Eventually, when the User Interface starts, regular screen content will appear.
Three Short Beeps
The battery is too low to boot the system. This check is made when the Power switch is turned on while the system is shut down.
Two Medium Beeps
The battery is full. This occurs when the charger is connected, and indicates that further charging is unnecessary.
One Long Beep
The device has been successfully reset (see The Reset Button).
Four Long Beeps
The system is about to reboot. This occurs after the VolumeDown+Dot4+Dot5+Dot6+Dot8 firmware key binding has been pressed.

8.2   Key Bindings

Simultaneously pressing VolumeDown, Dot1, Dot2, Dot3, and Dot7:
If the system is running then go to the Power Off screen. This is equivalent to a medium press of the Power button on an Android device.
Simultaneously pressing VolumeDown, Dot4, Dot5, Dot6, and Dot8:
If the system is running then reset the main processor and then boot the system. This is equivalent to a long press of the Power button on an Android device. You should hear four long beeps.

Switching the power on:

  • If the system is shut down then boot it. This is equivalent to a long press of the Power button on an Android device.
  • If the system is running then wake it up. This is equivalent to a short press of the Power button on an Android device.
Switching the power off:
If the system is running then put it to sleep. This is equivalent to a short press of the Power button on an Android device. The system itself will stay up, but most of the peripherals (the braille display, the keyboard, etc) will be shut down in order to save power.
Holding VolumeDown while switching the power on:
If the system is shut down then boot into Recovery Mode. This is equivalent to a simultaneous long press of the Power button and the Volume Up key on an Android device.

9   Quick Reference

9.1   Braille

9.1.1   Special Symbols

Special Braille Symbols
Symbol Dots Description
3768 undefined character
78 default cursor indicator
8 default selection indicator
⣏⠀⣹ 123478,0,145678 unchecked checkbox or switch off
⣏⠶⣹ 123478,2356,145678 checked checkbox or switch on
⠑⢄⡠⠊ 15,38,76,24 scrolling forward (down, right)
⡠⠊⠑⢄ 76,24,15,38 scrolling backward (up, left)

9.1.2   Annotations

Braille Annotations
Annotation Description
{text} the screen element's type
(text) the screen element's state

9.2   Key Bindings

9.2.1   Common Operations

Dot8
The Enter key (on a keyboard).
Backward
Pan one braille display length to the left (wrapping to the end of the previous line or going to the start of the previous screen element as needed).
Forward
Pan one braille display length to the right (wrapping to the start of the next line or going to the start of the next screen element as needed).
Left
Go to the previous character of editable text or pan to the left.
Right
Go to the next character of editable text or pan to the right.
Up
Go up one line of text or to the start of the previous screen element.
Down
Go down one line of text or to the start of the next screen element.
Space+Left
Go to the start of a list or line.
Space+Right
Go to the end of a list or line.
Space+Up
Go to the previous page of a list or paragraph of text.
Space+Down
Go to the next page of a list or paragraph of text.
Cursor
Bring the cursor to a specific character or click the current screen element.
Dot7+Cursor
Show the description of a specific character.
Dot3+Cursor
Show how a specific character has been highlighted.
Dot8+Cursor
Pan the braille display a specific amount to the right.
Space+Dots123
The Control+Home keys (on a keyboard). Go to the start of the input area.
Space+Dots456
The Control+End keys (on a keyboard). Go to the end of the input area.
Space+Dot7+Dots1236 (v)
Show the clipboard.
Space+Dot7+Dots1346 (x)
Clear the clipboard.
Space+Dot7+Dots14 (c)
Add the selected (or all) text to the clipboard.
Space+Dot8+Dots14 (c)
Copy the selected (or all) text to the clipboard.
Space+Dot7+Dots1245 (g)
Select the previous literary braille code.
Space+Dot8+Dots1245 (g)
Select the next literary braille code.
Space+Dots78+Dots1245 (g)
Show the current literary braille code.
Space+Dots235 (6)
Switch to typing in literary braille (six dots).
Space+Dots236 (8)
Switch to typing in computer braille (eight dots).
Space+Dot7+Dots2456 (w)
Turn off word wrap mode.
Space+Dot8+Dots2456 (w)
Turn on word wrap mode.
Backward+Dot1
Turn off the braille display.
Forward+Dot4
Turn on the braille display.
Backward+Dot2
Turn off reverse panning mode.
Forward+Dot5
Turn on reverse panning mode.
Backward+Dot3
Turn off long press mode.
Forward+Dot6
Turn on long press mode.
Backward+Dot7
Turn off one hand mode.
Forward+Dot8
Turn on one hand mode.
Backward+Forward
Show the values of important device status indicators.
Space+Dos24 (i)
Show the values of important device status indicators.
Space+Dots12345678
Cancel a key combination.

9.2.2   Input Operations

Dot7
Delete the character to the left of the cursor indicator.
Space+Dots145 (d)
Delete the character that the cursor indicator is on.
Space+Dot7+Dots145 (d)
Delete the previous word (or the start of the current word).
Space+Dot8+Dots145 (d)
Delete the next word (or the end of the current word).
Backward+Cursor
Set or change the start of the text selection.
Forward+Cursor
Set or change the end of the text selection.
Dot1+Cursor
Set or change the start of the text selection.
Dot4+Cursor
Set or change the end of the text selection.
Space+Dots17
Go to the start of the text selection (or to the cursor).
Space+Dots48
Go to the end of the text selection (or to the cursor).
Space+Dot8+Dot1 (a)
Select all of the text.
Space+Dot8+Dots1346 (x)
Cut the selected text to the clipboard.
Space+Dot8+Dots1236 (v)
Paste the current clipboard content.
Space+Dot7
Type the character represented by just dot 7.
Space+Dot8
Type the character represented by just dot 8.
Space+Dots136 (u)
Prompt for the Unicode value of the character to be typed.
Space+Dots1346 (x)
The keyboard Control key (applies to the next typed character).
Space+Dot7+Dots2345 (t)
Set the typing mode to text.
Space+Dot8+Dots2345 (t)
Set the typing mode to braille.
Space+Dots78+Dots2345 (t)
Show the current typing mode.
Space+Dots78+Dots125 (h)
Show the active highlighted typing styles.
Space+Dot7+Dots125 (h)
Turn off all of the highlighted typing styles.
Space+Dot7+Dots12 (b)
Turn off bold typing.
Space+Dot8+Dots12 (b)
Turn on bold typing.
Space+Dot7+Dots24 (i)
Turn off italic typing.
Space+Dot8+Dots24 (i)
Turn on italic typing.
Space+Dot7+Dots234 (s)
Turn off strike-through typing.
Space+Dot8+Dots234 (s)
Turn on strike-through typing.
Space+Dot7+Dots136 (u)
Turn off underlined typing.
Space+Dot8+Dots136 (u)
Turn on underlined typing.

9.2.3   Screen Operations

Space+Dots2456 (w)
Show a description of the current screen element.
Backward+LongPress
Go to the start of the previous screen element.
Forward+LongPress
Go to the start of the next screen element.
Backward+Space
Go to the start of the previous screen element.
Forward+Space
Go to the start of the next screen element.
Space+Dots126
Go to the first screen element.
Space+Dots345
Go to the last screen element.
Center
Tap (click) the current screen element.
Space+Center
Hold (long click) the current screen element.
Dot4+Up
Go to the Notifications screen.
Dot4+Down
The Android Home key. Go to the home screen.
Dot4+Left
The Android Back key.
Dot4+Right
Go to the Recent Apps screen.
Dot4+Center
The Android Menu key.
Space+Dots1345 (n)
Go to the Notifications screen.
Space+Dot7+Dots1345 (n)
Don't show notifications.
Space+Dot8+Dots1345 (n)
Show notifications.
Space+Dots123456
The Android Home key. Go to the home screen.
Space+Dots1356 (z)
The Android Back key.
Space+Dots1235 (r)
Go to the Recent Apps screen.
Space+Dots1245 (g)
Show a list of all the applications that are installed on the B2G.
Space+Dots134 (m)
The Android Menu key.
Space+Dots124 (f)
Find text within the current screen element (forward search).
Space+Dot7+Dots124 (f)
Find the previous occurrence of the same text within the current screen element.
Space+Dot8+Dots124 (f)
Find the next occurrence of the same text within the current screen element.
Space+Dots125,Dots123 (h l)
Show a list of all the actions that don't involve a cursor routing key.
Space+Dots125,Dots134 (h m)
Go to the plain text version of the User Interface manual.
Space+Dots125,Dots12345 (h q)
Go to the plain text version of the quick Start guide.
Space+Dots125,Dots1236 (h v)
Go to the plain text version of the VoiceOver guide.
Space+Dots125,Dots2456 (h w)
Go to the plain text version of the Limited Warranty and Return Policy.
Space+Dots125,Dots123456
Go to the product page for the B2G.
Space+Dots125,Dots78+Dots134 (h M)
Go to the HTML version of the User Interface manual.
Space+Dots125,Dots78+Dots12345 (h Q)
Go to the HTML version of the Quick Start guide.
Space+Dots125,Dots78+Dots1236 (h V)
Go to the HTML version of the VoiceOver guide.
Space+Dots125,Dots78+Dots2456 (h W)
Go to the HTML version of the Limited Warranty and Return Policy.
Space+Cursor
Show a list of all the actions that do involve a cursor routing key.
Space+Dots135 (o)
Go to the B2G Settings screen.
Space+Dots78+Dots134 (m)
Go to the B2G System Maintenance screen.
Space+Dots1234 (p)
Go to the Power Off screen.
Space+Dot7+Dots1234 (p)
Turn off Android's airplane mode.
Space+Dot8+Dots1234 (p)
Turn on Android's airplane mode.
Space+Dots2345 (t)
Go to the B2G digital clock.
Space+Dots1246 (ed)
Go to the NBP editor.
Space+Dots1456 (?)
Go to the current Google Assist app.
Space+Dots234,Dot1 (s a)
Go to the Accessibility Settings screen.
Space+Dots234,Dots12 (s b)
Go to the Bluetooth Settings screen.
Space+Dots234,Dots14 (s c)
Go to the Calendar app.
Space+Dots234,Dots145 (s d)
Go to the Dialer (Phone) app.
Space+Dots234,Dots15 (s e)
Go to the EMail app.
Space+Dots234,Dots124 (s f)
Go to the file manager.
Space+Dots234,Dots1245 (s g)
Go to the Gallery app.
Space+Dots234,Dots134 (s m)
Go to the Music player.
Space+Dots234,Dots1234 (s p)
Go to the People (Contacts) app.
Space+Dots234,Dots234 (s s)
Go to the Android Settings screen.
Space+Dots234,Dots34 (s st)
Go to the Store (Market) app.
Space+Dots234,Dots2345 (s t)
Go to the Text (Messaging) [SMS, MMS] app.
Space+Dots234,Dots1236 (s v)
Initiate an Android voice command.
Space+Dots234,Dots2456 (s w)
Go to the Wi-Fi Settings screen.
Space+Dots234,Dots3456 (s #)
Go to the Calculator app.
Space+Dot8+Dots123456 (home)
Add a shortcut to the home screen.
Space+Dot7+Dots123456 (home)
Remove a shortcut from the home screen.
Dot5+Left
Drag the current screen element to the left.
Dot5+Right
Drag the current screen element to the right.
Dot5+Up
Drag the current screen element upward.
Dot5+Down
Drag the current screen element downward.
Dot5+Center
Start a drag of the current screen element.
Dot6+Left
Drag to immediately left of the current screen element.
Dot6+Right
Drag to immediately right of the current screen element.
Dot6+Up
Drag to immediately above the current screen element.
Dot6+Down
Drag to immediately below the current screen element.
Dot6+Center
Drag to on top of the current screen element.
Backward+Forward+Space
Show details that identify the current build.
Space+Dots1236 (v)
Show details that identify the current build.

9.2.4   Speech Operations

Forward+VolumeDown
Turn off speech.
Forward+VolumeUp
Turn on speech.
Backward+VolumeDown
Speak only when the B2G is awake.
Backward+VolumeUp
Speak even when the B2G is asleep.
Dot1+Left
Stop speaking immediately (mute).
Dot1+Right
Speak the current line.
Dot1+Up
Speak from the start of the screen element to the start of the braille display.
Dot1+Down
Speak from the start of the braille display to the end of the screen element.
Dot1+Center
Speak all of the screen element.
Dot1+VolumeDown
Decrease the speech volume.
Dot1+VolumeUp
Increase the speech volume.
Dot2+VolumeDown
Decrease the speech rate.
Dot2+VolumeUp
Increase the speech rate.
Dot3+VolumeDown
Decrease the speech pitch.
Dot3+VolumeUp
Increase the speech pitch.
Dot4+VolumeDown
Adjust the speech balance more toward the left.
Dot4+VolumeUp
Adjust the speech balance more toward the right.
Dot5+VolumeDown
Speak only when the B2G is awake.
Dot5+VolumeUp
Speak even when the B2G is asleep.
Dot6+VolumeDown
Turn off speech.
Dot6+VolumeUp
Turn on speech.

9.2.5   Traditional Bindings

Space+Dot3
The Cursor Left key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dot6
The Cursor Right key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots36
Speak the current character (or the selected characters).
Space+Dots36+LongPress
Speak the current character (or the selected characters) phonetically.
Space+Dot2
Go to the start of the previous (or current) word.
Space+Dot5
Go to the start of the next word.
Space+Dots25
Speak the current word (or the selected text).
Space+Dots25+LongPress
Spell the current word (or the selected text).
Space+Dot1
The Cursor Up key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dot4
The Cursor Down key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots14
Speak the current line.
Space+Dots14+LongPress
Spell the current line.
Space+Dots23
The Page Up key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots56
The Page Down key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots13
The Home key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots46
The End key (on a keyboard).
Space+Dots12
The Shift+Tab keys (on a keyboard). Cycle backward to the previous control element.
Space+Dots45
The Tab key (on a keyboard). Cycle forward to the next control element.

9.2.6   Remote Braille Display Operations

Space+Dots78
Switch to the remote braille display.
Backward+Space
Switch to Baum Navigation Mode.
Forward+Space
Switch to Baum Keyboard Mode.
VolumeDown+VolumeUp
Switch back to Android.
9.2.6.1   Baum Navigation Mode Mappings
B2G Key Baum Key Also Known As
Dot1 D1 Display1
Dot2 D2 Display2
Dot3 D3 Display3
Dot4 D4 Display4
Dot5 D5 Display5
Dot6 D6 Display6
Backward F1 Function1
Dot7 F2 Function2
Dot8 F3 Function3
Forward F4 Function4
9.2.6.2   Baum Keyboard Mode Mappings
B2G Key Baum Key Also Known As
Dot1 B1 Dot1
Dot2 B2 Dot2
Dot3 B3 Dot3
Dot4 B4 Dot4
Dot5 B5 Dot5
Dot6 B6 Dot6
Dot7 B7 Dot7
Dot8 B8 Dot8
Backward B9  
Forward B10  
Space B11  

9.2.7   Advanced Operations

9.2.7.1   Common Actions
Space+Dots8+Dots135 (o)
Save the current B2G settings.
Space+Dots7+Dots135 (o)
Restore the B2G settings to their most recently saved values.
Space+Dots78+Dots135 (o)
Reset the B2G settings to their default values.
Forward+Space+Dot1
Turn on the most useful logging categories.
Forward+Space+Dot2
Clear the Android log.
Forward+Space+Dot3
Send a copy of the Android log to the B2G developers.
Forward+Space+Dot7
Turn off all of the logging categories.
Space+Dots78+Dot1 (a)
Turn on the logging of user interface actions.
Space+Dots78+Dot1+LongPress (a)
Turn off the logging of user interface actions.
Space+Dots78+Dots1345 (n)
Turn on the logging of internal screen navigation operations.
Space+Dots78+Dots1345+LongPress (n)
Turn off the logging of internal screen navigation operations.
Space+Dots78+Dots136 (u)
Turn on the logging of screen updates.
Space+Dots78+Dots136+LongPress (u)
Turn off the logging of screen updates.
Space+Dots78+Dots13 (k)
Turn on the logging of keyboard key events.
Space+Dots78+Dots13+LongPress (k)
Turn off the logging of keyboard key events.
Space+Dots78+Dots15 (e)
Turn on the logging of touch screen emulations.
Space+Dots78+Dots15+LongPress (e)
Turn off the logging of touch screen emulations.
Space+Dots78+Dots12 (b)
Turn on the logging of braille display updates.
Space+Dots78+Dots12+LongPress (b)
Turn off the logging of braille display updates.
Space+Dots78+Dots234 (s)
Turn on the logging of speech events.
Space+Dots78+Dots234+LongPress (s)
Turn off the logging of speech events.
Space+Dots78+Dots1346+LongPress (x)
Force a user interface action crash.
9.2.7.2   Screen Actions
Backward+Dots456
Write the current screen content to the Android log.
Backward+Dots568
Send a copy of the current screen content to the B2G developers.
Backward+Dot4
Go to and describe the parent node.
Backward+Dot5
Go to and describe the previous sibling node.
Backward+Dot6
Go to and describe the next sibling node.
Backward+Dot8
Go to and describe the first child node.
Backward+Dots56
Describe the current node.
Backward+Dots45
Force the screen to scroll backward (up or left).
Backward+Dots68
Force the screen to scroll forward (down or right).
Backward+Dots48
Go to the Android launcher chooser.

10   Tables

10.1   Braille Tables

10.1.1   Braille Characters

10.1.1.1   Dot Numbering

A standard braille cell consists of six dots arranged in three rows and two columns. Each dot can be specifically identified by its number as follows:

The Standard Six-dot Braille Cell
Dot Position Row Column Cell
1 top-left 1 1
2 middle-left 2 1
3 bottom-left 3 1
4 top-right 1 2
5 middle-right 2 2
6 bottom-right 3 2

Computer braille has introduced two more dots in a fourth row at the bottom.

Additional Dots in Computer Braille
Dot Position Row Column Cell
7 below-left 4 1
8 below-right 4 2

A picture may make this numbering convention easier to understand:

1 o o 4
2 o o 5
3 o o 6
7 o o 8
10.1.1.2   Unicode Braille Patterns

Actual braille cells are represented by the 256 characters within the Unicode range U+2800 through U+28FF. Each of the eight bits within the low-order byte of this range represents a braille dot within the cell, according to ISO 11548-1, as follows:

Unicode Braille Dots
Dot Cell Hexadecimal Decimal Binary
1 01 1 00000001
2 02 2 00000010
3 04 4 00000100
4 08 8 00001000
5 10 16 00010000
6 20 32 00100000
7 40 64 01000000
8 80 128 10000000

10.1.2   Computer Braille Characters

These tables show how US English braille characters are represented when Computer Braille is being used. This mapping is also used for locales that don't (yet) have their own.

10.1.2.1   North American Braille Computer Code

The North American convention for how the 95 basic ASCII characters are rendered in computer (8-dot) braille.

North American Braille Computer Code
Char- Code Bra- Dot Character
acter Point ille Numbers Name
U+0020 no dots Space
! U+0021 2346 Exclamation Point
" U+0022 5 Quotation Mark (Double Quote)
# U+0023 3456 Number Sign
$ U+0024 1246 Dollar Sign
% U+0025 146 Percent Sign
& U+0026 12346 Ampersand
' U+0027 3 Apostrophe, Acute Accent, Single Quote
( U+0028 12356 Left Parenthesis (round bracket)
) U+0029 23456 Right Parenthesis (round bracket)
* U+002A 16 Asterisk
+ U+002B 346 Plus Sign
, U+002C 6 Comma
- U+002D 36 Minus, Hyphen
. U+002E 46 Period
/ U+002F 34 Slash, Solidus
0 U+0030 356 Zero
1 U+0031 2 One
2 U+0032 23 Two
3 U+0033 25 Three
4 U+0034 256 Four
5 U+0035 26 Five
6 U+0036 235 Six
7 U+0037 2356 Seven
8 U+0038 236 Eight
9 U+0039 35 Nine
: U+003A 156 Colon
; U+003B 56 Semicolon
< U+003C 126 Less Than Sign, Left Angle Bracket
= U+003D 123456 Equals Sign
> U+003E 345 Greater Than Sign, Right Angle Bracket
? U+003F 1456 Question Mark
@ U+0040 47 Commercial At
A U+0041 17 Uppercase A
B U+0042 127 Uppercase B
C U+0043 147 Uppercase C
D U+0044 1457 Uppercase D
E U+0045 157 Uppercase E
F U+0046 1247 Uppercase F
G U+0047 12457 Uppercase G
H U+0048 1257 Uppercase H
I U+0049 247 Uppercase I
J U+004A 2457 Uppercase J
K U+004B 137 Uppercase K
L U+004C 1237 Uppercase L
M U+004D 1347 Uppercase M
N U+004E 13457 Uppercase N
O U+004F 1357 Uppercase O
P U+0050 12347 Uppercase P
Q U+0051 123457 Uppercase Q
R U+0052 12357 Uppercase R
S U+0053 2347 Uppercase S
T U+0054 23457 Uppercase T
U U+0055 1367 Uppercase U
V U+0056 12367 Uppercase V
W U+0057 24567 Uppercase W
X U+0058 13467 Uppercase X
Y U+0059 134567 Uppercase Y
Z U+005A 13567 Uppercase Z
[ U+005B 2467 Left Bracket (square)
\ U+005C 12567 Backslash, Reverse Solidus
] U+005D 124567 Right Bracket (square)
^ U+005E 457 Circumflex Accent
_ U+005F 456 Underscore
` U+0060 4 Grave Accent, Back Quote
a U+0061 1 Lowercase A
b U+0062 12 Lowercase B
c U+0063 14 Lowercase C
d U+0064 145 Lowercase D
e U+0065 15 Lowercase E
f U+0066 124 Lowercase F
g U+0067 1245 Lowercase G
h U+0068 125 Lowercase H
i U+0069 24 Lowercase I
j U+006A 245 Lowercase J
k U+006B 13 Lowercase K
l U+006C 123 Lowercase L
m U+006D 134 Lowercase M
n U+006E 1345 Lowercase N
o U+006F 135 Lowercase O
p U+0070 1234 Lowercase P
q U+0071 12345 Lowercase Q
r U+0072 1235 Lowercase R
s U+0073 234 Lowercase S
t U+0074 2345 Lowercase T
u U+0075 136 Lowercase U
v U+0076 1236 Lowercase V
w U+0077 2456 Lowercase W
x U+0078 1346 Lowercase X
y U+0079 13456 Lowercase Y
z U+007A 1356 Lowercase Z
{ U+007B 246 Left Brace (curly bracket)
| U+007C 1256 Vertical Bar
} U+007D 12456 Right Brace (curly bracket)
~ U+007E 45 Tilde Accent
10.1.2.2   Additional Common Symbols

The representations of these additional symbols have been designed such that they can be relatively easily remembered. The following methods have been used:

  • Adding dot 8 to a related letter, e.g. adding dot 8 to the letter c for the copyright sign.
  • Adding dot 7 to a related punctuation symbol, e.g. adding dot 7 to the dollar sign for the cent sign.
  • The superscript digits are rendered by adding dot 7 to the representations of the corresponding regular digits.
  • The subscript digits are rendered by adding dot 8 to the representations of the corresponding regular digits.
Additional Common Symbols
Char- Code Bra- Dot Character
acter Point ille Numbers Name
© U+00A9 148 Copyright Sign
U+00B6 12348 Paragraph Sign, Pilcrow
§ U+00A7 2348 Section Sign
® U+00AE 12358 Registered Sign
U+2122 23458 Trade Mark Sign
° U+00B0 1458 Degree Sign, Greek Theta
µ U+00B5 1348 Micro Sign, Greek Mu
¬ U+00AC 13458 Not Sign
U+20AC 158 Euro Sign
¥ U+00A5 134568 Yen Sign
£ U+00A3 34567 Pound Sign
¢ U+00A2 12467 Cent Sign
· U+00B7 467 Middle Dot, Bullet
« U+00AB 123567 Left-pointing Double Angle Quotation Mark
» U+00BB 234567 Right-pointing Double Angle Quotation Mark
± U+00B1 3467 Plus-Minus Sign
U+2212 367 Minus Sign
× U+00D7 167 Multiplication Sign
÷ U+00F7 347 Division Sign
U+2260 1234567 Not-Equal-To Sign
U+2264 3457 Less-Than-Or-Equal-To Sign
U+2265 1267 Greater-Than-Or-Equal-To Sign
U+2070 3567 Superscript Zero
¹ U+00B9 27 Superscript One
² U+00B2 237 Superscript Two
³ U+00B3 257 Superscript Three
U+2074 2567 Superscript Four
U+2075 267 Superscript Five
U+2076 2357 Superscript Six
U+2077 23567 Superscript Seven
U+2078 2367 Superscript Eight
U+2079 357 Superscript Nine
U+2080 3568 Subscript Zero
U+2081 28 Subscript One
U+2082 238 Subscript Two
U+2083 258 Subscript Three
U+2084 2568 Subscript Four
U+2085 268 Subscript Five
U+2086 2358 Subscript Six
U+2087 23568 Subscript Seven
U+2088 2368 Subscript Eight
U+2089 358 Subscript Nine
10.1.2.3   Additional Characters for Spanish

The representations of these Spanish characters have been designed such that they can be easily recognized. The following methods have been used:

  • The lowercase accented letters are rendered by adding dot 8 to their six-dot Spanish literary braille representations.
  • The uppercase accented letters are rendered by adding dots 7 and 8 to their six-dot Spanish literary braille representations.
  • The inverted punctuation symbols are rendered by adding dot 7 to the representations of the associated North American Braille Computer Code punctuation symbols.
Additional Characters for Spanish
Char- Code Bra- Dot Character
acter Point ille Numbers Name
á U+00E1 123568 Lowercase A with Acute
é U+00E9 23468 Lowercase E with Acute
í U+00ED 348 Lowercase I with Acute
ó U+00F3 3468 Lowercase O with Acute
ú U+00FA 234568 Lowercase U with Acute
ë U+00EB 12468 Lowercase E with Diaeresis
ü U+00FC 12568 Lowercase U with Diaeresis
ñ U+00F1 124568 Lowercase N with Tilde
Á U+00C1 1235678 Uppercase A with Acute
É U+00C9 234678 Uppercase E with Acute
Í U+00CD 3478 Uppercase I with Acute
Ó U+00D3 34678 Uppercase O with Acute
Ú U+00DA 2345678 Uppercase U with Acute
Ë U+00CB 124678 Uppercase E with Diaeresis
Ü U+00DC 125678 Uppercase U with Diaeresis
Ñ U+00D1 1245678 Uppercase N with Tilde
¡ U+00A1 23467 Inverted Exclamation Point
¿ U+00BF 14567 Inverted Question Mark
10.1.2.4   ASCII Control Characters

To type a control character, press Space+x (dots 1346) immediately before any of these characters:

ASCII Control Characters
Char- Code Bra- Dot Mne-  
acter Point ille Numbers monic Meaning
` U+0000 4 NUL Null Character
a U+0001 1 SOH Start of Heading
b U+0002 12 STX Start of Text
c U+0003 14 ETX End of Text
d U+0004 145 EOT End of Transmission
e U+0005 15 ENQ Enquiry
f U+0006 124 ACK Acknowledge
g U+0007 1245 BEL Bell
h U+0008 125 BS Backspace
i U+0009 24 HT Horizontal Tab
j U+000A 245 LF Line Feed (NL, New Line)
k U+000B 13 VT Vertical Tab
l U+000C 123 FF Form Feed (NP, New Page)
m U+000D 134 CR Carriage Return
n U+000E 1345 SO Shift Out
o U+000F 135 SI Shift In
p U+0010 1234 DLE Data Link Escape
q U+0011 12345 DC1 Device Control 1 (X-On)
r U+0012 1235 DC2 Device Control 2
s U+0013 234 DC3 Device Control 3 (X-Off)
t U+0014 2345 DC4 Device Control 4
u U+0015 136 NAK Negative Acknowledge
v U+0016 1236 SYN Synchronous Idle
w U+0017 2456 ETB End of Transmission Block
x U+0018 1346 CAN Cancel
y U+0019 13456 EM End of Medium
z U+001A 1356 SUB Substitute
{ U+001B 246 ESC Escape
| U+001C 1256 FS Field Separator
} U+001D 12456 GS Group Separator
~ U+001E 45 RS Record Separator
_ U+001F 456 US Unit Separator
? U+007F 1456 DEL Delete

10.2   Speech Tables

10.2.1   English Phonetic Alphabet

English Phonetic Alphabet
Letter Word
a Alpha
b Bravo
c Charlie
d Delta
e Echo
f Foxtrot
g Golf
h Hotel
i India
j Juliet
k Kilo
l Lima
m Mike
n November
o Oscar
p Papa
q Quebec
r Romeo
s Sierra
t Tango
u Uniform
v Victor
w Whiskey
x X-ray
y Yankee
z Zulu

10.2.2   Supported Diacritics

Diacritics (Accents) Supported by Speech
Name Where Shape
Acute above ascending line
Breve above lower half of a circle
Caron above descending line then ascending line
Cedilla below vertical line then right half of a circle
Circumflex above ascending line then descending line
Diaeresis above two horizontally-aligned dots
Grave above descending line
Macron above horizontal line
Ring above full circle
Tilde above full sine wave (upper half then lower half)

11   Technical Information

11.1   The Serial Port

The serial port is a 10-pin male connector under The Removable Cover in the corner nearest to the Power switch. In other words, with the bottom toward you and the side with the Power switch up, the port is in the upper-right corner. In this orientation, its pins are arranged in two five-pin columns. From top to bottom:

  • The pins in the left column are numbered: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
  • The pins in the right column are numbered: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10

Like this:

1 o o 2
3 o o 4
5 o o 6
7 o o 8
9 o o 10

The pins are used as follows:

Pin Function
2 inbound data
3 outbound data
5 ground

The port is configured as follows:

Property Setting
Baud 115200
Data Bits 8
Stop Bits 1
Parity none
Flow Control software (X-ON/X-OFF)